Hollywood’s Biggest Flops: Examining the High-Profile Projects That Failed to Make a Splash.

Hollywood’s Biggest Flops

Hollywood is a fickle industry, with projects that seem like surefire hits sometimes falling flat at the box office. Even big-name stars and established franchises are no guarantee of success. In this article, we’ll examine some of the high-profile projects that failed to make a splash and explore what went wrong.

John Carter (2012)

“John Carter” was a science fiction film released in 2012 that was based on the “Barsoom” series of novels by Edgar Rice Burroughs. The film had a budget of $250 million, but it failed to find an audience and only grossed $284 million worldwide. Critics were lukewarm on the film, citing a convoluted plot and lackluster performances.

The Lone Ranger (2013)

“The Lone Ranger” was a Western action film released in 2013 that starred Johnny Depp and Armie Hammer. The film had a budget of $225 million, but it failed to make a profit and only grossed $260 million worldwide. Critics panned the film, calling it bloated and poorly executed.

Cats (2019)

“Cats” was a musical film released in 2019 that was based on the hit stage production of the same name. The film had a budget of $95 million, but it was a critical and commercial failure, grossing only $75 million worldwide. Critics and audiences alike were turned off by the film’s odd visual effects and strange storyline.

Cutthroat Island (1995)

“Cutthroat Island” was a pirate adventure film released in 1995 that starred Geena Davis and Matthew Modine. The film had a budget of $98 million, but it was a critical and commercial failure, grossing only $18 million worldwide. The film’s poor box office performance is often cited as a major factor in the bankruptcy of Carolco Pictures.

Battleship (2012)

“Battleship” was an action film released in 2012 that was based on the board game of the same name. The film had a budget of $209 million, but it failed to make a profit and only grossed $303 million worldwide. Critics and audiences alike were turned off by the film’s derivative plot and lack of originality.

‘Turning Red’ (2022)

“Turning Red” is an upcoming animated film set to be released in 2022. The film has an estimated budget of $200 million, but it has been reported that it is on track to lose $168.1 million due to poor box office performance.

“Mars Needs Moms”

Released in 2011 and had a budget of $150 million. The film follows the story of a young boy named Milo, who embarks on a journey to save his mother from aliens on Mars. Despite featuring the voice talents of popular actors such as Seth Green and Joan Cusack, the film failed to connect with audiences and was a critical and commercial disaster. It grossed only $39 million worldwide, resulting in an estimated loss of $143.4 million for the studio.

“Mulan,”

Another high-profile flop. The film, which had a budget of $200 million, was expected to be a box office hit, given the success of previous Disney live-action remakes. However, the film was mired in controversy before its release due to comments made by the lead actress, Liu Yifei, regarding the Hong Kong protests. The film also faced backlash for its decision to remove key elements of the original animated film, such as the character of Mushu and the songs. Ultimately, the film grossed only $70 million worldwide, resulting in an estimated loss of $140.8 million for the studio.

“Around the World in 80 Days”

Released in 2004 and had a budget of $110 million. The film, which was based on the classic novel by Jules Verne, starred Jackie Chan and Steve Coogan. Despite featuring a star-studded cast and being directed by Frank Coraci, who had previously directed hit films such as “The Wedding Singer” and “Click,” the film failed to impress audiences or critics. It grossed only $72 million worldwide, resulting in an estimated loss of $114 million for the studio.

Conclusion

These are just a few examples of Hollywood’s biggest flops, but they illustrate how even the most highly anticipated projects can fall short. In many cases, these failures can be attributed to poor critical reception, bad word of mouth, or simply bad luck. However, they also serve as a reminder that success in Hollywood is never guaranteed, no matter how big the budget or how famous the stars. Ultimately, the best way to avoid a flop is to create a quality product that resonates with audiences, but even that is no guarantee in the ever-changing landscape of Hollywood.

Author Profile

Mark Boardman
Mark Boardman
Mark Boardman is an established showbiz journalist and freelance copywriter whose work has been published in Business Insider, Daily Mail, Bloomberg, MTV, Buzzfeed and The New York Post amongst other press. Often spotted on the red carpet at celebrity events and film screenings, Mark is a regular guest on BBC Radio London and in-demand for his opinions for media outlets including Newsweek. His TV credits include This Morning, The One Show and T4. Email Mark@MarkMeets.com

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